USEDTIRES.COM WEBSITE IS PREPARING TO SELL QUALITY USED TIRES ONLINE DIRECT TO CONSUMERS


Used Tire News–Deerfield Beach, Fl- All you have to do is a quick internet search for used tires, used tire, buy used tires, or used tires near me. Inevitably online sellers of used tires will appear at the top of the search result. Usedtires.com is now selling on Facebook Marketplace and eBay. Usedtires.com is also selling on the internet in a few other online marketplaces and the LetGo app. We currently have our website designer working on installing a database generator that will allow you to shop by brand or size for quality used tires.

TIRE SAFETY 101-WHEN BUYING ANY USED CAR CHECK THE TIRES DRY ROT-BUYING USED TIRES IS EASY KNOW WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Used Tire News-
AS THE ECONOMY HAS WORSENED UNDER THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION AND COVID -19THERE IS ONE INDUSTRY HAS BOOMED THE USED TIRE INDUSTRY. THE SALE OF USED TIRES IS SOMETHING THAT HAS TAKEN PLACE WORLDWIDE SINCE THE ADVENT OF THE PNEUMATIC TIRE. ONE PERSON CHANGES A SET OR A PAIR AND DIGARDS THE OLD TIRES. tHE OLD TIRES THEN AFTER PROPER INSPECTION BY A TIRE EXPERT ARE INSPECTED AND REPAIRED IF NEEDED tHEN THIS TIRE GOES INTO THE USED TIRE MARKETPLACE. TODAY YOU CAN BY ONLINE OR ATA BRICK AND MORTAR TIRE SHOP. USED TIRES ARE SIOLD WORLDWIDE THE MARKET IS HUGE AND DEMAND FOR GOOD USED TIRES IS HIGH.
AS WITH ANY USED PRODUCT A USED CAR OR A USED TIRE SHOULD ALWAYS BE PROPERLY INSPECTED FOR IMPERFECTIONS.

BUYING A USED TIRE OR A USED CAR CHECK FOR DRY ROT

What is dry rot?
Also known as sidewall cracking, dry rot is a specific type of tire decay that can occur as a tire ages or is consistently exposed to harmful substances and kept in inappropriate conditions. Advanced dry rot can cause small cracks on the outside edges of your tire tread. If this happens it could have a negative impact on your car’s handling, even if your tread still has adequate depth overall.

Though it might appear similar, dry rot tires are by no means considered blemished tires. Blem tires do have imperfections but they are only cosmetic – which means they do not affect tire performance in any way. You can learn more about blemished tires in another blog post.

Tires degrade over time because the rubber loses its protective resin. The resin protects the tire from oxidizing and drying out. When the tire loses these protective properties, it becomes frail and begins to crack.

What causes dry rot?
The most common cause of dry rot is a long period of inactivity. If a vehicle is stationary for a long period of time, the tires will start to dry out. Tires are intended for frequent use by their design, the aforementioned resins mean the tires to be in continual use for them to release their protective oils and keep the tire from drying out. So, the longer your car is sitting in one place, the danger of dry rot becomes more likely.

dry Tires in a desert
Tires in a desert (probably really dry).
As climate and exposure to the sun are big factors in the appearance of dry rot, the danger is that much greater if your vehicle is parked outside for an extended period of time, exposed to the elements. To cover all the bases, here’s a list of all the factors that may contribute to dry rot:

Excessive or direct sunlight that exposes the tires to harmful UV rays
Long term exposure to high temperatures
Long term exposure to low temperatures
Exposure to chemicals such as motor oils, industrial cleaning solutions, pool maintenance chemicals, etc.
Underinflation, especially when the car is driven regularly
Ozone generated by electrical equipment
Extended periods of vehicle inactivity, especially when combined with any of the above
How to spot dry rot?
Dry rot manifests itself in a couple of ways. A new, healthy tire has a smooth appearance while the most common sign of dry rot is cracking. As mentioned, dry rot dries the tire, so if your tires have been struck by dry rot, you may notice pieces of the rubber chipping away from the tire. Cracks on the sidewall might start appearing. The tire may start to lose color, appearing more gray than black, and this is a clear sign that the dry rot is starting to take hold.

Tire Dry Rot
Dry rot tire.
Cracks on the outside of the tread may also appear. The cracks on the tread are the most dangerous symptom of dry rot, as they affect the vehicle’s handling. These cracks could be large and noticeable or thin and more subtle, depending on the degree of the dry rot.

Is it safe to drive with dry rot tires?
The smartest course of action is to not tempt fate and have dry rotted tires switched out immediately upon noticing the issue. Since cracks appear due to dry rot, the tire can lose air through these cracks. If these tires are then consistently driven on, the cracks start to grow larger and deeper.

If the crack goes deep enough to reach the nylon strands that are woven into the tire to support the weight of the vehicle, the heat accumulated through driving will enlarge the tire and it may break apart while you are on the highway.

How to prevent dry rot?
The factors that cause dry rot can be curbed by taking a few preventative measures. The industry standard is to swap out tires before they get to be 10 years of age (some tire companies recommend replacement as early as six years after manufacture). Don’t skimp when purchasing new tires, go for the highest quality tires you can afford when replacing an old set of tires. When purchasing, choose tires based on speed rating and tread wear strength.

Even if you have no need for it, drive your car regularly, avoid letting a car sit unused for a long period of time, and especially avoid letting your car sit in harsh environmental conditions for those extended periods. Pay special attention to your tires if you live in a part of the world that experiences all four seasons. The shifting between hot and cold temperatures accelerates the aging process in tires, especially if the shifts in temperature come rapidly. If you happen to live somewhere with extreme temperatures (winter or summer) then it’s a good idea to check your tires for signs of dry rot more often.

Keep your car in a climate-controlled garage to reduce the chances of dry rot. If you do park in a garage, keep chemical solutions, heaters, and electrical equipment away from your car. If you must park outside, pay attention to the weather. Cover your entire car or use tire covers to minimize the effects of temperature fluctuations.

Check air pressure as often as you can. Underinflated tires can collapse and crease the sidewall of the tire. Older tires are more likely to crack, collapse or develop dry rot if driven while underinflated. According to a study by the NHTSA, 14% of all passenger vehicles in the U.S. have at least one underinflated tire. You can also utilize protective tire sealants. They can renew the shine of a new tire and also protect the tire from harmful UV rays that can lead to cracking and dry rot.

USED TIRE NEWS-ExxonMobil engages in pyrolysis, forms joint venture with chemical recycler


USEDTIRES.com The Used Tire News authority

Used Tire news-Deerfield Beach Fl-From WEIBOLD.com-ExxonMobil engages in pyrolysis, forms joint venture with chemical recycler
PYROLYSIS

JANUARY 7, 2021

Gradeall
2020 has become a great year in forming partnerships between tire and plastic pyrolysis companies with world’s leading chemical producers, and pyrolysis operators with tire manufacturers. In the beginning of 2021, good news comes again, this time – from the plastics pyrolysis domain, which nevertheless goes hand in hand with end-of-life tire pyrolysis.

Agilyx – a chemical recycling company – and ExxonMobil have created a joint venture that will sort and recover waste plastic, the chemical recycling company recently revealed.

The joint venture, called Cyclyx International, will develop ways to aggregate and process waste plastics, preparing them for recycling. Under an agreement signed by the two companies, ExxonMobil will invest $8m for a 25% stake in Cyclyx, Agilyx said.

In return, ExxonMobil will get priortised access to plastic waste for recycling projects that it is developing, Agilyx said. ExxonMobil will also get access to Agilyx’s artificial intelligence platform. The two companies will work together to develop more technologies and techniques. Agilyx said it will benefit from a royalty on all the feedstock flowing through Cyclyx.

The company had created Cyclyx earlier to connect waste companies with chemical and mechanical recyclers. ExxonMobil is a founding member of the joint venture. Cyclyx wants to attract other companies, which could include retailers, brand owners, waste-management companies, petrochemical producers and municipalities.

Accoriding to ICIS, by 2025, Cyclyx plans to develop systems that can collect and sort 300,000 tons/year, Agilyx said. The company did not specify if the figure is in short tons or metric tons. By 2030, Cyclyx wants to process 3 million tons per annum of waste plastic around the world, it said.

ExxonMobil said, “The agreement will enable the development of innovative solutions for aggregating and pre-processing large volumes of plastic waste to be used as raw material in recycling processes.”

Collecting, sorting and pre-processing plastic waste has been one of the main challenges of recycling the material, whether chemically or mechanically. Under mechanical recycling, waste plastic is cleaned, sorted and remelted. Sorting is critical, since different types of plastic can contaminate the recycled resins and compromise its performance.

Chemical recycling breaks down the chemical bonds in the plastic, producing feedstock that can be re-polymerised to form new plastics with properties nearly indistinguishable from virgin material. Chemical recycling can handle mixed plastics and material that is too dirty or degraded for mechanical recycling. However, chemical recycling requires chemical plants.

Chemical recycling also needs some degree of sorting, since the chlorine in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) can react during chemical processes to produce harmful byproducts. Agilyx has a plant in Tigard, Oregon state in the US, which relies on pyrolysis to convert waste polystyrene (PS) into styrene oil.

For the full article, please proceed to the website of Independent Commodity Intelligence Services ICIS.

USED TIRES ARE SAFE


USED TIRES ARE SAFE

Used Tire News-usedtires.com- Deerfield Beach, Fl-
As we have posted previously buying used tires is safe. The used tires you purchase should be well inspected, free from apparent damage, and no more than 8 years old for passenger cars is recommended. Air tested and visual inspections are always recommended. Contrary to what some new tire makers have put out there the simple act of taking a tire from a rim does not render it unusable. Tire makers via their trade group US Tire Manufacturers Association have for decades spread false rumors about potentially dangerous used tires, nonsense. Each and every used tire is or is not usable depending on different factors of safety. The simple fact you may not know the history of the tire,(what the hell does that mean anyway) is not one of them. The age, condition, and appearance of anomalies are things that need to be considered. In most cases, tires are so well-made they can have two if not three lives. The use if used tires by a sector of the economy not able to purchase new tires has and is always been in the tire market. In the US we sell over 30 million used tires a year. That is why the new tire makers speak badly about our industry they have a tough time competing with s in certain markets and are sore losers.

THE GUIDE TO BUYING USED TIRES


Used Tire News-Usedtires.com-Deerfield Beach, Fl-As with all things automotive and tires safety first. Some in the new tire industry, mainly Goodyear, Bridgestone Firestone, and Michelin over recent decades have said and written some nasty things about used tires. The tire makers instead of using facts distort reality to paint used tires as potentially unsafe. Their main reason is you do not know the history of the tires life. We say Bullshit, if the tire is well inspected and came off or out of service only because the owner was sold a set of new tires, there is nothing wrong with reselling a good used tire. The EPA states Reuse which when you purchase a safe used tire is reuse is the highest form of tire recycling.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration states that about ten percent of auto accidents are tire-related. Most of the time it is the tire owner’s failure to maintain proper tire pressure.
Why buy new tires? Cost these days makes purchasing new tires cost-prohibitive to many. That is why used tire sales have flourished in many countries and the U.S A well-inspected used tire can save the consumer hundreds of dollars and still provide safety. The continuous use of the old worn-out tire is what is dangerous not the use, a good well-inspected used tire A new set of tires can run into the thousands of dollars today which is why the used tire market is booming and a safe alternative.
Tread Depth
Tread depth is the vertical measurement between the top and the bottom of the rubber pattern on the tire. Statistics show that a depleted tread is one of the main factors of tire-related traffic accidents. You need to measure the tread depth before purchasing a used tire.

Most tires usually have 6 tread wear bars throughout their grooves which serve as indicators for the minimum allowed tread depth which is 2/32”. The bars become visible when the tread is reaching a certain depth. You should measure in different grooves, as used tires may be affected with uneven wear. Tire models have several grades of bars: at 8/32”, 6/32”, 4/32”, and 2/32”.

The best way to do this with an external tool is to use a tread depth gauge. This is an inexpensive tool you can find in any auto shop. Insert the gauge’s pin into a groove and press it towards the tread. You will get a precise reading of your used tire’s tread depth in inches and millimeters. You can also get an accurate reading from a ruler by using a 1/16” scale.

If you don’t happen to have access to any of these, you can also measure tread depth with a penny or a quarter. The two ways of performing this test are:

Checking Tire Depth With Quarter Coin
Checking tire depth with a quarter coin.
Put a penny sideways into a tread groove and look at how much of Lincoln’s head hides in it. If you can see all of it, the tire is worn out with 2/32” tread depth. If a small part of the head is still in the groove, you may have 4/32” tread left. Then use a penny with the Lincoln Memorial facing you. If the top of it is covered by the used tire’s tread, you have 6/32” or more. If you’re using a quarter, insert it between the ribs of the tire and see if the tread covers a part of Washington’s head. If it does, you have a tread of 4/32” or more.

The different levels of depleting tread depth are as follows:
– 6/32” and more is a satisfactory tread depth.

– 5/32” is usually still sufficient, although tires may exhibit weaker traction on wet roads.

– 4-3/32” this level is borderline between still usable and unsafe.

– 2/32” at this level tires are considered bald and unsafe.

Look For Signs of damage
Check the tire for punctures that have already been repaired, repaired punctures within an inch of either sidewall are especially hazardous. If you see missing chunks of rubber or other damage at the tire’s bead areas, that might prevent it from sealing properly making it unsafe to use. The bead area is the inner circle of the tire that connects the tire to the wheel and holds it together.

Check the entire surface of the tire for visible cracks or cuts in the sidewall. If the sidewall has bumps or other irregularities it is also unsafe to use as an impact might have forced the rubber to detach from the belts. Also, check for irregular wear that might expose the steel cords inside the tire. If there are some sticking out, the tire is unsafe to use.

You really want to make sure the used tire is safe for driving. In order to help you with that, we made an in-depth article on the topic.

Age of the tire
Tires show a four-digit number that indicates its age on its sidewall. The first two numbers show the week in which it was manufactured, and the other two digits represent the year. For example, a tire with a DOT code of 1518 was made in the 15th week of 2018. You should know the tire’s identification number.

Remember do not thump them Pump them and check regularly your tire pressure with a gauge.

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH USED TIRES WHEN THEY NEED TO BE RECYCLED-USED TIRE RECYCLING-TIRE BALING OR TYRE BALING


Used tire News-Usedtires.com -Deerfield Beach, Fl-In the last ten years a new way to recycle tires was born. Tire baling gives tire recyclers and used tire sellers a way to ship tires for disposal overseas cheaper by compacting them. Used Tire baling is a huge part of the tire recycling industry today. In the US we dispose of over 300 million scrap tires a year. Many can be reused and are sold as used tires. Used Tires provide consumers an alternative to buying high priced new tires. Every used tire sold at least saves the dumps or cement kilns from disposing of the carcass temporarily. Reuse Reduce Recycle, buy used tires.

Gradeall International – a renowned supplier of tyre bailing and tyre recycling technology from Northern Ireland – reports that its MK2 tyre baler has been a successful product for the company and its clients. In production for over 10 years, the MK2 tyre baler has found customers across the globe.

Challenges with end-of-life tyre bales
One thing some customers have found during the baling process is that regular PAS108 tyre bales are slow and laborious to load into a shipping container. While PAS108 bales are great for civil engineering applications the usage bales for construction has been rather limited bringing into question the need to produce bales to that specific size.

The actual bale size is not really important to tyre recycling plants, the MK3 tyre baler has been specifically designed to make bales that fit into shipping containers to make transporting tyre bales to recycling plants as straightforward and as efficient as possible.

Gradeall MK3 Tyre Baler in action | Photos by Gradeall International.

Tyre bales are transported via shipping container to a tyre recycling plant. With a standard PAS108 bale, it requires 3 bales to be stacked on top of each other and one bale loaded in beside it vertically. It is turning the 4th bale vertically that significantly adds time to the container loading and unloading process.

The MK3 tyre baler is the solution, it produces tyre bales specifically to go into the width of a standard shipping container, with ample space to spare to ensure bales are also easy to remove.

Benefits of the Gradeall MK3 Tyre Baler
Reduce 40-foot container loading times from 1 hour, to 20 minutes
20-22 MK3 tyre bales in a container, compared with 33 MK2 tyre bales.
Produce bales containing 130-140 tyres per bale, compared with the 85-90 tyres possible in a MK2 tyre baler.
Bales typically weigh 1200 kg
Container loading/unloading is easier, quicker, and safer
If you are at full capacity with a MK2 tyre baler, a MK3 baler will help you upscale your tyre baling operations.

Gradeall MK3 Tyre Baler in action | Video by Gradeall International.

Gradeall says it has had several MK3 tyre balers at a number of sites undergoing extensive testing for over 2 years now. With customers of the baler extremely pleased with the reliability, durability and improved efficiency that comes with the baler. It reduces bale wire costs, shipping, and handling costs. All with the same ease of use and longevity the MK2 tyre baler has been known for.

The increased speed at which the MK3 tyre baler can produce bales has also opened up the avenue for a conveyor to feed tyres to this baler to minimise time lost due to operators searching for more tyres.

To learn more about the technical specifications of MK3 tyre baler and inquire for price, please proceed to Gradeall’s website.

USEDTIRES.COM ONLINE STORE IS COMING


UsedTires.com- Deerfield Beach, Fl-Used Tire News-As we reported yesterday, you have asked and we have listened. Usedires.com the worldwide leader in used tire sales will be offering used tires direct to the public. Stay tuned to our news posts and we will keep you updated.
As we have reported many times this year the fastest growing sector of the sued tire industry is online direct to consumer. Much like Tire rack has mastered the online tire sales niche Usedtires.com hopes to master the inline used tire sales niche. We will be offering the highest quality used tires in singles, pairs and sets direct to you.

Used Tire News- Tire Recycling- Bicycle Tires


Used Tire News-Deerfield beach,Fl-Usedtires.com- Recycling bicycle tires. F

Used Tire News-Deerfield Beach, Fl-

From weibold.com-

Leading bicycle distributor links up with tube and tyre recycling company in the UK
PARTNERSHIPS

NOVEMBER 13, 2020

Gradeall
The e-magazine Cycle Industry News reports that Madison – one of the UK’s leading bicycle parts and accessories distributors – had linked up with national tube and tyre recycling company Velorim in a bid to offer its retailers a channel to dispose of end-of-life tyres and rubber waste.

The magazine says that with the legislation on scrapping bicycle tyres now caught up with the same rules applicable to car tyres. Velorim set out to assist retailers in disposing of their waste.

Participating bike stores, workshops, hire schemes and cycle refurbishment centres can all now become local collection points. The rubber collected will be reprocessed into new materials, or re-used in other ways, with zero going to landfill and none exported. At present, the majority of the 30,500,000 used tyres and 152,500,000 tubes end up in landfill each year.

Those opting to take part will be asked to collect enough product to fill either a tyre cage (100 x 120 cm), a tyre bag for those with less space, or a tube box (30cm x 40cm x 50cm). Valves must be cut out of tubes prior to shipping. A tyre recycling cage will hold around 180 tyres, a bag around 25 tyres and a carboard box around 160 inner tubes.

For shops and workshops involved in the scheme there is an initial set up fee of £65 for tyre cages and £10 for tyre bags or inner tube boxes. Thereafter there are collection fees for the tyres and inner tubes to be recycled, which are as follows:

£90 per tyre cage collection
£16.50 per tyre bag collection
£20 per tube box collection
According to the magazine, shops needn’t foot the bill entirely though, reminds Velorim, which says that a small levy on customers asking for waste disposal is entirely acceptable.

Russ Taylor about Velorim | Video by Aston University.

“You can charge consumers an amount, for example: 50p per tyre and 20p per inner tube to recycle these with your businesses, or you can encourage consumers to buy a new tyre or inner tube in store and include the costs of recycling as part of the purchase,” says the firm.

Shops are able to request point of sale and merchandising materials ranging A5 information leaflets, an eco-banner, an A4 Strut Card or a dump bin for the tyres to be collected in for instore.

Unfortunately tubes that carry sealant or have multiple repair patches adorned can not be recycled.

Velorim notes that collections can be arranged by email at support@velorim.co.uk. Dealers can find a view and download a full list of FAQs by logging into Madison B2B and here.

Article: courtesy of Cycling Industry News.
#usedtires
#UsedTireNews

ECO Green Equipment – one of the world’s leaders in end-of-life tire shredding equipment helps Missouri-based trucking company convert old truck tires into rubber mulch.


Used Tire news-Usedtires.com-Deerfield Beach,Fl-From weibold.com-

ECO Green Equipment – one of the world’s leaders in end-of-life tire shredding equipment helps Missouri-based trucking company convert old truck tires into rubber mulch.

ECO Green’s recent press release reports that Prime Inc., a Missouri-based trucking company that had been devoted to retreading their used tires, discovered that 20% of end-of-life tires couldn’t be retreaded, and those tires — all 100,000 per year — were ending its lifecycle at landfills. With the help of ECO Green Equipment, they’re improving the environment by creating environment-friendly valued-added products and making money while doing it.

photo
ECO Green Equipment installed at Prime’s premises | Photo: ECO Green Equipment.

ECO Green Equipment is one of the global leaders in turnkey, cost-effective tire recycling systems and integrated tire shredding equipment. ECO Green says that its modular equipment is designed and engineered to deliver optimum production efficiencies for a broad spectrum of rubber aftermarkets, to include rubber mulch, crumb rubber, rubber powder, tire derived shreds (TDS), and wire-free chips.

Prime Inc. reached out to ECO Green for a solution to their tire waste problem. With the help of ECO Green’s equipment – the manufacturer highlights – Prime now converts dual truck and super single tires into rubber mulch and other value added product that can be sold for use in landscaping, walking trails, athletic surfaces, and playground surfaces.

“This process greatly reduces our waste and gets us to a sustainable place where everyone needs to be,” said Mike Jones of EcoShred, the division of Prime Inc. that is dedicated to recycling the company’s tires. “We can now process 98% of the material that comes through.”

Tire Recycling In The United Kingdom Many Tire Recyclers Non Compliant

Used Tire News-Usedtires.com-UK’s Tyre Recovery Association (TRA) reports that a Freedom of Information request (*FOI request submitted by ‘Tyre & Rubber Recycling’ magazine) has starkly exposed levels of non-compliance by many operators claiming ‘T8 exemptions’ for their businesses.

TRA says that in 2019 inspections of almost sixty sites carried out by the Environment Agency across England revealed more than one third to be legally non-compliant. Further action in the EA, conducted in the first 8 months of 2020, showed the situation to have further worsened with almost 50% of sites visited failing to meet legal requirements.

‘This confirms all our worst fears,’ said Peter Taylor OBE, TRA Secretary General, ‘T8 exemptions were intended to offer a ‘light’ touch regulating regime under which small businesses could operate but instead it has been very widely abused as we have long argued. In very many cases this approach allowed irresponsible players to flout the Law yet enjoy levels of overhead and compliance well below those of fully permitted businesses. We are pleased that government now intends to end this gateway to poor practice.’

The Tyre Recovery Association urges all those disposing of end-of-life tyres and especially vehicle dismantlers and tyre retailers to carefully scrutinise the compliance status of those to whom they pass on their waste, their own legal Duty of Care demands it. Tyre recycling industry’s own Responsible Recycler Scheme provides just that assurance of best practice. RRS members are audited and re-certificated annually and endeavour always to maintain high standards of service and compliance.

Press release by Tyre Recovery Association.

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